Major Hurricane Sam Bringing ‘Life-Threatening’ Swells To East Coast—Even Though Storm Is 900 Miles Away

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on pocket
Pocket
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Major Hurricane Sam Bringing ‘Life-Threatening’ Swells To East Coast—Even Though Storm Is 900 Miles Away

Topline

Hurricane Sam hasn’t made landfall anywhere during its extraordinarily long trek through the Atlantic Ocean, but the U.S. East Coast will be dealing with “life-threatening surf and rip current conditions” this weekend from the distant Category 4 hurricane, which is already bound for the record books just for sticking around so long.

Key Facts

Sam is packing maximum sustained winds of 130 mph as it moves over the central Atlantic Ocean, about 335 miles east-northeast of Bermuda and around 900 miles from the U.S. coastline.

The storm is moving away from the U.S. and poses no imminent threat to land, but forecasters are warning that swells from the storm will produce dangerous seas along essentially the entire East Coast, leading to local National Weather Service offices issuing rip current statements all the way from New England to south Florida.

Sam has now maintained major hurricane status (Category 3 or higher) for more than a week, holding Category 4 status for most of that time.

Hurricane Sam has been a Category 4 storm since early Tuesday morning, and it’s now cracked the top 10 among storms in history for the longest consecutive period holding Category 4 strength or higher in the Atlantic basin, according to the National Hurricane Center.

What To Watch For

Sam is forecast to stay a major hurricane for at least another 24 hours, but its time as a hurricane is likely to come to an end in about three days. At that time, Sam is expected to “spectacularly transition into a large hurricane-force post-tropical cyclone,” according to the National Hurricane Center. The massive north Atlantic storm that Sam will transition into still won’t be near land for a while, but it appears it will be tracking toward Iceland in about six days.

Surprising Fact

The National Hurricane Center first started issuing bulletins on an area of disturbed weather that would become Hurricane Sam on September 19, while the system was over Africa.

Key Background

The 2021 Atlantic Hurricane Season doesn’t end until November 30, but it’s already been one of the most active in history. Just one name—Wanda—still remains on the normal storm naming list. It seems almost certain the naming list will be exhausted for only the third time in history, after the 2005 and 2020 seasons. A change from those years is that there is now a list of auxiliary names forecasters can tap into—they previously started naming storms after letters of the Greek alphabet when the naming list ran out. The most intense storm of the season so far has been Hurricane Ida, which slammed Louisiana on August 29 with 150 mph maximum sustained winds, devastating coastal communities and knocking out power to parts of the New Orleans area for weeks. Ida’s potent remnants then pushed northward through the U.S., bringing historic flooding to the New York City area, where most of the storm’s deaths were reported. At least 48 confirmed Ida-related deaths took place in New York and New Jersey.

Further Reading

Hurricane Season About To Take A Major Turn For The Worse, Government Forecasters Say (Forbes)

New Orleans Regains Partial Power After Hurricane Ida But Full Return Could Take Weeks Or More (Forbes)

Source link

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on pocket
Pocket
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp

Related News

Never miss any important news. Subscribe to our newsletter.

Recent News

Editor's Pick